Sight Words

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.
CT State Standards: Build sight word vocabulary. RR 4.15

 

Sight Words

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • Make a bingo board of sight words. Have family game night and practice reading these words as a family. - Read a book with your child. As you approach a familiar sight word, pause and let the child fill in the word for you.
  • Sing your hearts out! Scatter sight word cards on the table and sing a song to the tune of Where is Thumbkin :

Who has _____ (the), who has ______ (the) Find your word, Find your word. Whoever has the sight word that was said, they would respond with: Here it is! Here it is! Run away _______(the), run away ______(the)

  • Sing another song! Pick different words for each round! The Word on the Bus to the tune of The Wheels on the Bus:

The word on the bus says ____ (the), ____(the), ____(the) ______(the), _______(the), _______(the) The word on the bus says ____ (the), ____(the), ____(the).

  • Play HangWord! Played just like Hangman, have your child pick a sight word. Teammates have to keep guessing letters until the figure out what the secret word is!
  • Word Race! Print the sight word flash cards and see if your child can answer more words within a time limit. Did they get 10 words in a minute? Maybe next time they can get 15!

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

CT State Standards: Build sight word vocabulary. RR 4.15

 

Dolch Sight Words

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • Print all of the Dolch flash cards and lay them on a table, word face down. Take turns picking a flash card. Can you create a sentence using that word? For an extra challenge, try picking up 3 to 4 words. Can you use all of these words in one sentence? Make sure that the sentences created are valid.
  • On a piece of paper, write the alphabet vertically. Using the printed Dolch flash cards, find where each word goes within the alphabet. Do you have the word about? If so, then it would go with the A. See which letter has the most Dolch words!
  • Create super sentences! Create teams and see who can create the longest sentence with the Dolch words. Make sure that your sentences may sense. Make sure to award extra bonus points for creativity or speediness!
  • Go to the library or the book store and find high frequency readers. These books contain a higher amount of sight words compared to other books. Here are some titles:
    • I Can See by Andrea Klein
    • Lunch by Gay Su Pinnell
    • Dogs by Amy Levin
    • I Like by Gay Su Pinnell
    • We Like Fruit by Millen Lee and Tungwai Chau

 

This lesson aligns with the following standards:

National Standards: Students use spoken, written, and visual language to accomplish their own purposes (e.g., for learning, enjoyment, persuasion, and the exchange of information).
  • Students adjust their use of spoken, written, and visual language (e.g., conventions, style, vocabulary) to communicate effectively with a variety of audiences and for different purposes.

CT State Standards: Build sight word vocabulary. RR 4.15

 

Fry Sight Words

You may be asking what other activities you can do with your child to further reinforce the skills learned and practiced on the website and in school.

  • Print the Fry word flash cards and set up a schedule to read all of them. Set aside 20 words to read nightly before your child goes to bed.
  • Read a book with your child. Every time that they hear a Fry word, have them raise their hand or make a silly noise. As they become more proficient in this task, do not give any hints- keep your voice monotone.
  • Grab your favorite childrens' magazine and cut out all of the Fry words that you find. You'd be surprised just how many of those little words are hiding!
  • Play Bingo with the Fry words. Have your child be the caller and the bingo player. This is a great way to practice the words both receptively as well as expressively.
  • Roll, Say, Keep- This is a great game! Create a game board with 6 squares. Within each square, draw a dice. Draw the correct number of dots in each box. Each b ox should have up to 6 dots. Place a Fry word flash card in each box, word facing up. Have your child roll the dice. Whatever number they rolled will the word they have to read. If they read the word correctly, they get to keep it. If they were incorrect, it stays on the game board. Make sure to replace the cards as the words are correctly read.